THE PEANUT FARMER
Partnership To Fight Southern Corn Rootworm
The Center for Agricultural Partnerships and North Carolina State University Cooperative Extension have formed a partnership to help peanut farmers decide when to treat for southern corn rootworm. MORE>>


MINNSOY VOICE
Water Quality and Nitrogen Addressed at Symposium
"Nitrogen is like water. It is necessary, but too much water in one place at one time can he a problem," said Hugoson. ''This is a wake-up call for agriculture, and as farmers, it's something we have to pay attention to." MORE>>


DIAMOND WALNUT NEWSLETTER
The New IPM Implementation Projects Initiated in California Walnut Orchards
By Steve Wulfert and Pat Weddle

Relentless regulatory pressure against the use of organophosphates important to walnut pest management continues...Further regulatory actions are likely. Consequently, walnut growers will be availing themselves of new pesticidal technologies including mating disruption for codling moth. MORE>>


Hispanic orchardists learn importance of monitoring
By Geraldine Warner

Naná Simone has compiled a manual in English and Spanish describing common orchard pests and diseases and how to monitor them. MORE>>


THE PEANUT GROWER
Know Your Rootworm Risk
Now growers have an easy way to determine if their field is at risk and whether they should treat for rootworms - the SCR Advisory. MORE>>


SOYBEANDIGEST.COM
Water-Quality Sleuths
By Natalie Knudsen

Nutrient runoff from farm fields is being blamed for the "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico. But there isn't any solid data on how to improve water quality without jeopardizing farm profits. About 70 southwestern Minnesota corn growers will help change that. MORE>>


THE GREAT LAKES RADIO CONSORTIUM
Apple Growers Trim Pesticides from The Farm
By Lester Graham

Bill Erwin and a number of other Michigan apple growers are involved in a huge project to reduce pesticide use in orchards. Erwin says he's among those who will continue the practice.
MORE>>


 

THE FARMER/DAKOTA FARMER
How Much N?
by Randy Frahm

Studies indicate that less fertilizer may be safer and more profitable in the in the Minnesota River Valley. First-year results showed 90 to 120 pounds of N per acre maximized yields.
MORE>>


THE SACRAMENTO BEE
Pheromones Are
In The Air

by Stuart Leavenworth

Now, in their ongoing battle against bugs, Central Valley farmers are using the sexual habits of insects as a weapon against them. More and more, they spray pheromones – chemicals emitted by all creatures to attract mates – to fog orchards with a confusing cloud of sexual scents and make it more difficult for pests to reproduce.

It's an experimental technique but one that holds great promise.
MORE>>


THE PEANUT FARMER
Custom Pest Control
Predicting risk and treating only when needed just got a little easier for V-C producers. MORE>>


ARCHIVES

FARMER-STOCKMAN
Super-Sized IPM
by Mike Federman

Pear growers in the Yakima Valley are running a three-year, extra-large IPM experiment for controlling insects. MORE>>


CENTRAL WASHINGTON AG WORLD
Grants Pay for Pear Pest Control by Rick Steigmeyer

PESHASTIN - A new pest control program for Wenatchee Valley pear growers doesn't rule out the use of pesticides. But it will make it possible to take advantage of beneficial insects that could help growers greatly reduce use of the most toxic insecticides. MORE>>


THE NEUSE LETTER
A Message From The Neuse Education Team
Back in 1997, the Neuse Education
Team realized that in order to
meet the 5-year, 30% nitrogen reduction goal for agriculture – as mandated by North Carolina’s General Assembly – the Team needed significant resources to lead an effective, basin-wide education
program that would lead to water
quality improvements. MORE>>